Rare Natural Expression Fibers

In 1988, Andy McMurry travelled across the ocean to personally select sheep with the rarest colors, softest fleeces, and most refined genetics. After extensive study of extraordinarily rare and curious natural colored lambs being born into flocks of elite white Merino and Romney sheep, a small handful of these very special sheep made their way to his Missouri family farm. This genesis would eventually become Genopalette – a palette of sheep in naturally occurring colors, which now grace the Missouri grasslands.

Andy set out to share his vision with the world. From those early days in the 1980s, and continuing in this new millennium, the mission of Genopalette has been to spread the spectacular uniqueness of this fiber's truly natural comfort, style, and beauty. Genopalette fleeces are now shipped around the world to discriminating handcraft fiber artists who also revel in the natural palette and luxurious textures. Call that rare wool rave!

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Slate Brown Exclusive Genopalette

Exclusive Genopalette American farm rare natural colored undyed slate brown wrapped Merino yarn knit

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White Exclusive Genopalette

Exclusive Genopalette / all American small farm rare natural colored undyed White yarn knitting felt

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Cinnamon Moorit Exclusive Genopalette

Exclusive Genopalette / all American small farm rare natural colored undyed cinnamon moorit wrapped

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Growers & Farmers

As in selecting the sheep themselves, Andy extends his discriminating sensibilities to all areas of their care, from breeding to feeding. The Genopalette flock rotationally grazes a variety of highly nutritious native and planted grasses for as much of the year as possible. This puts nutrients right back into our already fertile Missouri River soils and creates healthier sheep and cleaner wool. Our balanced system actually sustains and enhances the luminous, undyed tones of our natural colored flock: the minerals native to our soil and feed contribute heavily to the various colors of the sheep ... Read More



Why
Genopalette?